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Apr 18

The Cosmic Hologram: Beyond the Brain

cosmic-hologramExcerpt from The Cosmic Hologram by Jude Currivan PhD

Realizing that everything we call physical reality is the expression of the in-formational intelligence of cosmic mind completely reframes the question of human and indeed all consciousness and cognizance. The view of most neuroscientists has been that our consciousness somehow arises from the brain as a localized phenomenon. Just as a turbine generates energy, so the view goes, our brain generates consciousness—somehow.

That final “somehow” is crucial. While neuroscience has managed to map neural networks in the brain, identifying which areas light up during certain mental processes and progressively noting their holographic nature, there remains no mechanism for the integration of neuronal activities with the immaterial perception of self-awareness.

Based on numerous experimental data on the nonlocality of our consciousness, an alternative has been to view the brain instead as a computer: a receiver and transmitter of nonlocal information. However, with increasing discoveries and the emerging understanding of the cosmic hologram, the computer-brain-mind metaphor is also coming to be seen as too limited in its perspective. Not only does it fail to account for the inter-dimensional communications reported extensively by transpersonal experiencers, but—and even more fundamentally—it still implicitly suggests a duality between the physical world and consciousness.

Instead, the paradigm-shifting view of the cosmic hologram, which recognizes the actual immateriality of the physical realm and the ultimate unity of consciousness, is offering a new view of the brain and its purpose. By identifying the brain as playing an important role in the in-formational organization of the embodied awareness of human beings, it redefines each of us as a unique and microcosmic individuation of the intelligence of the cosmic hologram of our Universe, literally making us co-creators of reality.

Existence, Experience, and Evolution

Following Russian theatre director Constantin Stanislavski’s lead, acting coach Lee Strasberg introduced the idea of method acting to the United States in the 1920s. Such “method” immerses an actor in the personal identification of the role he or she is playing, often remaining “in character” not only when onstage or on a film set, but beyond.

As individuated consciousness, when we incarnate on Earth, most human beings also undertake a process of such acting, where, as spiritual method actors, we immerse ourselves in the drama of our lives. By identifying with the roles we play, and, as we’ve seen, the erroneous perception of materiality, we may marginalize or even forget our innate spiritual consciousness. The egos of our self-awareness instead immerse us in the perception that we’re separate, both from each other and the world around us.

The personas we inhabit during our lives are thus the lenses through which we perceive the Universe—how we relate to it and how it relates to us. So such method acting offers an intensity of presence, which our associated experiences could otherwise appear less “genuine” to us, and in the sense of the cosmic hologram, less creative in its universal manifestation of the nature of physicalized reality.

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