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Jul 16

The Mind-Body Connection: How to Discover the Emotional Roots of Disease and Illness

Image1by The Healers Journal

HJ: 95% or more of disease is a result of deep unhealed emotional wounds, traumas and belief patterns. In this illuminating, research backed guide, you’ll learn to see the connections between what’s going on in your heart and mind and what’s happening in your body.

– Truth

The Cause of Your Physical Pain And Disease Is You

By Michael Forrester

withyourselfYes, you. Not the environment, your mother’s genes or your junk food diet. Everything in your body that you see manifested as form and phenomena comes from the vibrations within your body which then give rise to either health or disease. What we feel–our emotions coordinate our biochemical, cellular and complete physiological states our entire lives. In other words, the cause of all disease is not tangible at all. Our outlook on life and how we feel about ourselves may be the most relevant health predictor of all.

mind-body-diseaseMany people are already familiar with the fact that emotional stress can lead to digestive issues, irritable bowel syndrome, tension and headaches, but many may not be aware that can also cause other physical illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and even symptoms of severe chronic pain.

More subtly, one might develop psychosomatic symptoms or stress-related symptoms because of unresolved emotional issues. These are not new discoveries; researchers have studied the mind/body interrelationship for several decades because of the importance of this link.

Researchers around the world are slowly integrating research on how our energetic and emotional states cause health and/or disease. How we connect emotionally to our overall wellness and wellbeing may indeed be more relevant than any supplement, food, exercise, medical intervention or health treatment.

Pain is Both Physical and Emotional, But Healing Emotionally Can Eliminate Physical Pain

Pain, of course, is always both a physical and an emotional experience. There are direct neural connections via the brain stem and spinal cord. The circulatory and lymphatic systems also carry neurotransmitters (hormones and immune cells) that find receptor sites in the brain which feedback and modulate the links between brain and body. In this way, every cell in the body every cell — is linked into the nervous system and as such, can be sensed and felt, whether or not we allow ourselves to be aware of this psychobiological fact.

With a physical pain, there is an obvious link between the psychological experience of pain and an awareness of a physical location in the body. The pain seems to come from an elbow, or a toe, or a hip. Weirdly, we can feel the physical pain in that location even though most, but not all, of the processing is going on in the brain. The neural, blood, and immune pathways between brain and body are tagged with body location information, beginning in the spinal cord and with successively more specific tagging up through the brain stem and thalamus, each adding another layer of redundancy and complexity, until the experience becomes conscious and further identified as “mine” in the insula, parietal, and motor cortices. The marvel of the nervous system is that even though body sense awareness is largely a creation of cortical complexity, we feel in 3-D: the pain is “in” my knee, that object is “out there” in space, etc.

So, with this kind of logic, we can come back to the neural similarities between emotional and physical pain. If the similarity is not just in the brain but in the body, it’s perfectly reasonable to ask: Where does an emotional pain hurt? If there really is an economy of pain networks that includes both physical and emotional pain, and if physical pain has a body location, then this simple syllogism leads to the conclusion that emotional pain must have a physical location in the body.

Feelings of insecurity get the heart and the breath out of synch and activate the sympathetic nervous system as if we were dealing with a threat (elevated heart rate and blood pressure), and can create a sense of unease in the chest, and even pain. People who have been hurt by others often have retracted chests and downcast postures, which are muscular ways of protecting the heart and closing off the self from fully engaging with others for fear of being hurt again. And people in insecure relationships are more likely to have cardiovascular (and other health) problems than those who are more secure.

Vibration is Energy

Every type of energy has a different vibrational frequency. For example, water has one, and when it turns to ice, it has a different vibration. When it turns to vapour, the vibration changes again. Sound waves have their own frequency of vibration. Of all these, thought vibration is the strongest. Most of our thoughts we turn into words — spoken words — and these words we put into action. Action when repeated again and again, form our habits, is it not? And our very nature, our character, is determined by our habits. Every tomorrow that we wake up is then determined by our nature and character.

[More…]

 

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